Owl's Findings

I am the Owl, and I welcome you to my garden.

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About the Owl

Time of Day for Spellcrafting

natural-magics:

•Morning: awakening, new beginning, fertility, life direction.
•Daytime: growth, financial gains, good life, generosity.
•Midday: willpower, strength, sustenance, perseverance, overcoming obstacles.
•Twilight: change, receptiveness, parenting, moving between the worlds.
• Evening: camaraderie, spirituality, joy, pleasure, family gatherings, children, play.
•Late Night: occult learning: increase knowledge/wisdom, enlightenment, creativity.
•Midnight: releasing, recuperation, recovery, closings, endings.

Source: Grimoire for the Green Witch: A Complete Book of Shadows by Ann Moura

(Source: averywitchyblog)

davemahan:

"Descent to the Zenith"
“Ritual Knife”
“Flying Ointment”
“Drawing Down the Moon”
“Divination”
“Cottage Witch”
“The Horned One”

I have always been a much bigger fan of black and white art than I have color work. For everyone else who shares my tastes, here are the original black and white versions of the 7 main pieces from my year long thesis project. My thesis was an investigation into witchcraft, paganism, and the occult. The final colorized versions of these pieces all came out well, but there is something about the black and white versions that doesn’t come across in the color versions.

All of these pieces were produced between August and December of 2013. They are all 12”x18” mixed media on illustration board or paper.

Digital prints of all these pieces are available at www.etsy.com/shop/workweak

(via spiritscraft)

norsemanarts:

Jörmungandr - Wood Burning by Norseman Arts. 
My Facebook. 

norsemanarts:

Jörmungandr - Wood Burning by Norseman Arts

My Facebook

(via natural-magics)

twigthemoonchild:

my Altar decoration for Beltane.

twigthemoonchild:

my Altar decoration for Beltane.

(via psychologicalwitch)

blackpoisonousrivers:

My Thursian Altar on Flickr.
Image by: Darby Lahger (Old Hag)

blackpoisonousrivers:

My Thursian Altar on Flickr.

Image by: Darby Lahger (Old Hag)

(via pixie-witch)

artsfantasia:

Gaia by Michael C. Hayes
One of the first entities to have come into being, Gaia is the personification of Earth in Greek mythology. The mother of all, to her were born the the Earth, the heavens, the gods, the Titans, and the Giants.
(A World of Fantasy)

artsfantasia:

Gaia by Michael C. Hayes

One of the first entities to have come into being, Gaia is the personification of Earth in Greek mythology. The mother of all, to her were born the the Earth, the heavens, the gods, the Titans, and the Giants.

(A World of Fantasy)

(via glassyeyedliving)

"Go be a Witch"

rootandrock:

When I say “Go be a Witch” or “Go do Witchery” or any variation on that theme it’s not so much about action as how that action affects you.

If you do something woo-woo and your heart gets all wild and free? That thing. Do that. If you feel a mad rushing like you’re breathing in far more than your lungs can hold - like you’re inhaling holy fire and it’s spreading through your veins. If you’re teetering on that edge where it feels like something is about to happen? That.  If you come down from it full of joy you cannot explain and a sense of fulfillment? That’s what I’m talking about.

And while I don’t truck with the line of “(insert thing here) is whatever you want it to be” YOUR craft is whatever you want it to be. Take away the labels, take away the need to fit into a mold and do what makes you powerful.

And before anyone starts saying “Oh my gosh but what if it’s this really harmful- ” Stop. You know I don’t mean that kind of thing and you equally know it is not my job to police the internet. GO BE A WITCH.

(via spiritscraft)

lokavinr:

(I’m breaking my hiatus one last time because this is IMPORTANT)
Guys. Old Norse insults are dangerous things. They might look really fun for those who do not know the language, but most of them carry sexual implications that are extremely misogynist and queerphobic.
For example, in the last twenty four hours many heathen groups have started throwing around níðingr (“nithing”) and threats of níðstang in their discussions about Frazier Glenn Cross. This terminology is inherently queerphobic, and all associated words and practices likely carry similar implications.
Preben Meulengracht Sørensen describes níðingr as such:

"We must assume that the action and labeling of a man as níðingr suggested a full range of morally reprehensible attributes with ergi at its symbolic center" (Norrønt Nid 38: Translation mine)

That is to say that níð and its associated words and actions carry the connotation of passive homosexual behavior and the so-called “related” attributes (cowardice, underhanded behavior, trickery, and magic work) and, while less severe than argr/ergi, still suggest essentially the same thing.
Examples of níð insults in the Eddas and sagas jive with this interpretation. For example, we see níð insults occurring in two basic forms:
tunguníð, or spoken níð, including níð poetry about another person, insulting suggestions of unmanliness/passive behavior made during senna, hvöt episodes, or during other conflicts, and usually containing explicit or implicit suggestions of ergi. Words and phrases such as níðingr and hvers manns níðingr are often used.
tréníð: “Carved níð.” The most common example are the carvings of “one man standing behind the other” found in Gísla saga ch. 2 and Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa ch. 17. This also includes the níðstang carved by Egill Skallagrímsson in ch. 60 of his saga.
The heathen community seems especially fond of the latter example of níð, I imagine because it is one of the few “magic spells” that is described step-by-step in the sagas. However, although not explicitly stated during the crafting of this particular pole, the name links it to níð insult and thus the practice likely carried queerphobic connotations. Some have argued that the placement of the mare corpse with a pole penetrating its flesh suggests passive sexuality, whereas others have suggested that the runes carved thereon must have contained insinuations of “unmanliness.” I do not think we can know for sure where the níð accusation rested with this act, but through its name and link to the níð insult category we have to acknowledge that it was present there in some way, as Sørensen and other “post-Ström” scholars have asserted.     
Some of you may be thinking, ‘But surely some of these words were divorced from their inherently queerphobic meaning, and were not always used to suggest passive homosexual behavior.’ I disagree, but, as a researcher of queer issues in Old Norse literature, I may be a bit biased in these matters. But even if we assume that níð did not imply (at least through association) passive homosexual behavior every time it was used to describe a man, it still strikes me as a problematic word to throw around.
If we compare it to modern queerphobic slurs like “faggot” or “homo” (which strikes me as a fair comparison, even though níð was much less colloquial), it may help us to understand this issue. Now, not everyone who throws around these slurs is directly suggesting homosexual activity. On 4chan, for example, “newfag” is used to talk about new users. Additionally, many people use these slurs to imply other “negative” behaviors (being afraid, effeminate, uncool, or weak) without directly meaning to invoke the gay sexual aspect. But that doesn’t make these words any less harmful: they are still slurs that, at their root, condemn a particular group of people (GSM individuals) and, in doing so, both link them to and condemn particular traits and behaviors. So it is with níð.
This is not to say queer heathens cannot attempt to reclaim these words by applying them to themselves. I know a lot of queer heathens, Lokeans in particular, who use ergi/argr as a descriptor. That is fine, because it is a member of that group who would have been slandered with these terms embracing them and casting them in a positive light. But when the broader heathen community, particularly cis-hetero members of that community, suggest using these terms as insults, it is in no way acceptable. One cannot reclaim a word when it is still being used for slander or is being utilized by the cis-hetero majority. That is not how reclamation works. 
The sheer amount of heathen resources suggesting níð and related words/practices as an effective way to condemn someone (here, here, and here, just to name a few) sickens me. I want to believe it is all an honest mistake, and people are unaware of the queerphobic connotations, but I simply cannot be sure. 
Before using any of these words or practices, please, PLEASE educate yourself. Do not fight bigotry with more bigotry. Do not use slurs against other minority groups just to make a point.

lokavinr:

(I’m breaking my hiatus one last time because this is IMPORTANT)

Guys. Old Norse insults are dangerous things. They might look really fun for those who do not know the language, but most of them carry sexual implications that are extremely misogynist and queerphobic.

For example, in the last twenty four hours many heathen groups have started throwing around níðingr (“nithing”) and threats of níðstang in their discussions about Frazier Glenn Cross. This terminology is inherently queerphobic, and all associated words and practices likely carry similar implications.

Preben Meulengracht Sørensen describes níðingr as such:

"We must assume that the action and labeling of a man as níðingr suggested a full range of morally reprehensible attributes with ergi at its symbolic center" (Norrønt Nid 38: Translation mine)

That is to say that níð and its associated words and actions carry the connotation of passive homosexual behavior and the so-called “related” attributes (cowardice, underhanded behavior, trickery, and magic work) and, while less severe than argr/ergi, still suggest essentially the same thing.

Examples of níð insults in the Eddas and sagas jive with this interpretation. For example, we see níð insults occurring in two basic forms:

  • tunguníð, or spoken níð, including níð poetry about another person, insulting suggestions of unmanliness/passive behavior made during senna, hvöt episodes, or during other conflicts, and usually containing explicit or implicit suggestions of ergi. Words and phrases such as níðingr and hvers manns níðingr are often used.
  • tréníð: “Carved níð.” The most common example are the carvings of “one man standing behind the other” found in Gísla saga ch. 2 and Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa ch. 17. This also includes the níðstang carved by Egill Skallagrímsson in ch. 60 of his saga.

The heathen community seems especially fond of the latter example of níð, I imagine because it is one of the few “magic spells” that is described step-by-step in the sagas. However, although not explicitly stated during the crafting of this particular pole, the name links it to níð insult and thus the practice likely carried queerphobic connotations. Some have argued that the placement of the mare corpse with a pole penetrating its flesh suggests passive sexuality, whereas others have suggested that the runes carved thereon must have contained insinuations of “unmanliness.” I do not think we can know for sure where the níð accusation rested with this act, but through its name and link to the níð insult category we have to acknowledge that it was present there in some way, as Sørensen and other “post-Ström” scholars have asserted.    

Some of you may be thinking, ‘But surely some of these words were divorced from their inherently queerphobic meaning, and were not always used to suggest passive homosexual behavior.’ I disagree, but, as a researcher of queer issues in Old Norse literature, I may be a bit biased in these matters. But even if we assume that níð did not imply (at least through association) passive homosexual behavior every time it was used to describe a man, it still strikes me as a problematic word to throw around.

If we compare it to modern queerphobic slurs like “faggot” or “homo” (which strikes me as a fair comparison, even though níð was much less colloquial), it may help us to understand this issue. Now, not everyone who throws around these slurs is directly suggesting homosexual activity. On 4chan, for example, “newfag” is used to talk about new users. Additionally, many people use these slurs to imply other “negative” behaviors (being afraid, effeminate, uncool, or weak) without directly meaning to invoke the gay sexual aspect. But that doesn’t make these words any less harmful: they are still slurs that, at their root, condemn a particular group of people (GSM individuals) and, in doing so, both link them to and condemn particular traits and behaviors. So it is with níð.

This is not to say queer heathens cannot attempt to reclaim these words by applying them to themselves. I know a lot of queer heathens, Lokeans in particular, who use ergi/argr as a descriptor. That is fine, because it is a member of that group who would have been slandered with these terms embracing them and casting them in a positive light. But when the broader heathen community, particularly cis-hetero members of that community, suggest using these terms as insults, it is in no way acceptable. One cannot reclaim a word when it is still being used for slander or is being utilized by the cis-hetero majority. That is not how reclamation works.

The sheer amount of heathen resources suggesting níð and related words/practices as an effective way to condemn someone (here, here, and here, just to name a few) sickens me. I want to believe it is all an honest mistake, and people are unaware of the queerphobic connotations, but I simply cannot be sure.

Before using any of these words or practices, please, PLEASE educate yourself. Do not fight bigotry with more bigotry. Do not use slurs against other minority groups just to make a point.

THIS IS A PSA

likeclockworkcircles:

THE MESO-AMERICAN CULTURES STILL EXIST.

THE MAYA ARE STILL LIVING.

THE AZTECA ARE STILL LIVING.

MOST ARE STILL ALIVE TODAY AND ARE FIGHTING TO RETAIN THEIR RIGHTS TO THEIR SACRED SITES, RITUALS, AND PRACTICES BECAUSE PEOPLE THINK THEIR CULTURES ARE DEAD WHEN THEY’RE NOT.

THEY ARE STILL LIVING.

STOP THAT.

(via nightinthewoods)